Veronica Bianqui: New Song ‘Victim’ Donates to Harm Reduction Coalition

Tell us about “Victim” and how you came to write this song? Does it have special meaning to you?

I started with a simple guitar line that was sort of like a line in Grease’s “Summer Nights.” It slowly developed over time, as I couldn’t quite figure out a chorus for it for while until one day it clicked. Yes, the song has special meaning because it marked a turning point in how I viewed myself and the world around me. It was a time when I was ready to take charge of my feelings, and learn what they really are, and accept them for what they are.

On “Victim,” what is the “place” where you’re locked in and who is doing the locking?

The place is a psychological trap, like an addiction. The person doing the locking could be anyone from a lover or my own inner demons. It changes depending on what I’m feeling at the time.

 

You are donating the proceeds of “Victim” to Harm Reduction Coalition. Why did you choose this organization?

I chose this organization because I wanted to pick one that does more than just send addicts to rehab. I wanted to choose one that reaches the root of the problem, and aims to change drug laws. It’s an organization that does practical work in preventing addicts from contracting diseases, accidentally overdosing, and more. My sister’s mother-in-law, Julia Negron works in the field of harm reduction as well, and she recommended them.

What is the secret to a good collaboration as in yours with Matt Adams of The Blank Tapes? How did you meet?

Matt is a great songwriter and producer, and I think he just has great ideas to help fine-tune a lot of my arrangements. We met at a show in Echo Park. I suppose the secret is first and foremost knowing what you yourself envision, and bringing in other people you trust to throw in their ideas and suggestions.

From the sounds of your work, you’re a big fan of the 1960s. What is so attractive about the sound of that era?

Probably all the years of watching the Wonder Years as a kid. I’ve always been attracted to the ’60s, since I was a kid. However, I’m not trying to replicate the era verbatim. I want to bring a modern take with contemporary themes to classic sounds.

Where can we follow you and where can our readers catch you live next?

No shows until either later in the year or early next year, so stay tuned!
You can follow me at VeronicaBianqui.com
Instagram @veronicabianqui or facebook.com/veronica-bianqui

Who are the musicians you most admire and why?

I most admire musicians who maintain integrity with their art, their message (if they have one), and stay focused. I guess these are qualities I strive for with my own art, and so I respect and admire others who do this, too.

What do you enjoy about touring? What is the biggest drag about touring?

I love that you can’t really look back or get too attached to anything or anyone on the road, except maybe your band. You have to keep moving forward, no matter the weather, no matter how tired. There’s something poetic about it to me. The biggest drag is sitting so long—hurts my back!

What advice would you give young artists today?

Don’t have a backup plan.

Related Post

Comments

comments